2010/05/31

Increase the Effectiveness of Your Tapping Session With This Strategy

 


Note from Pat Carrington

Hello Everyone,

I am always interested in increasing the effectiveness of a tapping session, making it last, making it really worthwhile.

But I had never before thought about the notion that Gene Monterastelli suggests in his article below. Gene highlights the fact that tapping is not just an immediate activity - something you do now, for a few moments, and that is that.  While it seems that you are just tapping for a few moments and then it's all over, is that really the case? Or does a tapping session merely set off a spark that starts a process that starts a larger process, and so on, and on?

Interesting idea that.  If it's true, then we are somehow "tapping" all day long, enjoying the spreading of the benefits throughout our systems while we engage in other activities. The continuance of the healing may be as important, or maybe even more important, than the tapping session itself.

This is a novel way of thinking about the tapping process.  I think you will want to see what Gene has to say about it and try his tapping method to facilitate the spread of the healing that is commenced during each of your sessions.

 

How To End A Tapping Session to Ensure That Healing Will Continue

                                                   by Gene Monterastelli

Gene Monterastelli is an EFT practitioner in Baltimore, MD, and author of numerous articles on EFT that appear in this newsletter and regularly on his website http://www.tappingQandA.com.

Gene's Article

I think the way we end a tapping session is just as important as the way we begin it. For me the end of the session is more than a signing off process -- it's actually the next step in healing. When we tap it is not just a healing moment but part of a healing process that is going to continue throughout the day and throughout our life.

I like to spend time at the end of a session (especially an emotional one) setting up my entire body/mind system to continue this work throughout the day. The end of a session therefore often looks and sounds like this:

Karate Chop Spot:   I give thanks for the fact that I have this amazing power to heal.

Inner Eyebrow:  I give thanks for the time I have available to do this work.

Inner Eyebrow:  I give thanks for the time I have available to do this work.

Outer Eye:  I give thanks for my desire to continue with this work.

Under Eye:  The work I have done today is not just a healing moment.

Under Nose:  .but part of a healing process.

Under Mouth:  This healing process is going to continue throughout my day.

Collar Bone:  There will be times when I notice the healing continuing.

Underarm:  .and I will smile at the amazing power of my system.

Underarm:  .and I will smile at the amazing power of my system.

Top of Head:  There will be other times when the healing continues in the background.

Inner Eyebrow:  I know full well that I don't need to be conscious of the healing for it to continue.

Outer Eye:  This healing will cascade through my body, from cell to cell.

Under Eye:  I know this healing is one more step along the way.

Under Nose:  It is not just a healing of the moment.

Under Mouth:  .but also a building block, preparing me for the next piece of healing my system is ready for.

Collar Bone:  I know that as I continue this healing process, bit by bit.

Under Arm:  .my whole system is going to heal in a natural way that will ensure that this is not a quick fix.

Top of Head:  .but a lasting change.

Inner Eyebrow:  Tonight as I sleep the changes I have made in this session will work their way into every part of my system.

Under Eye:  So that when I awake tomorrow, I will be relaxed and refreshed.and looking at the world through new eyes, based on this healing.

Under Mouth:  I am so grateful.

Collar Bone:  I am so grateful.

Thank you Gene for these healing thoughts.

Pat



 

 

 NOTICE FROM PAT

I will soon be letting you in on information about an upcoming f-r-e-e teleseminar I will give in the near future.  In it my invited guest and I will explore a milestone in energy psychology that is about to be announced.  Be on the alert for this announcement.

 

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Tips to Get Good Placements For Pampered Pets

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Cats & Dogs
For Indiana
Tuesday June 1, 2010


Tips to Get Good Placements For Pampered Pets
By Connor R Sullivan

Anyone who has a much loved pet and who is due to travel away from home, should try out dog boarding in Snohomish or dog boarding in Bellevue as excellent places to leave their pampered pooches. These places cater for pets which cannot be left alone but they also offer some value added services thrown in as well.

Many people think that kennels are just places to dump their pet. But these days there is far more on offer than that. Training can be undertaken which will allow the pooch to be shown correct behavior for when the owner comes back to collect them.

For example, many pooches will have some very bad habits that the owner just does not have the heart to break. This can include begging at the table when people are eating, or perhaps jumping up at the owner when they come in from work. Even not allowing the spouse to kiss the owner is the problem with some pets when they feel like they are the alpha male in the family. However, all these habits can be broken very quickly by these experts who know the psychology of the animals.

Indeed, the owners themselves will also receive some training when they come to pick up their pet so that they can reinforce the training on home ground. Although owners may think that they are doing the right thing most of the time, it is unfortunate that most of us will just be too soft for our own good and this is where the kennels come in to sort out the problems.

Even if the pet is perfectly behaved, they may still need the company of other pets to get them familiar with their behavior. Being social animals makes them much more rounded individuals and they will be able to play and have fun with the other animals without there being a problem with bad tempers or biting etc.

After learning to play with the others, they will also be taken for a bath and brush up so that the owner gets a clean and fresh animal to take home with them. This is particularly good for those who have a hard time getting them into water and then washing them. At the kennels, they are shown how to do this with ease and make it a fun experience for the pet too so there will be no more headaches.

Finally, realizing that the pet is sometimes scared of others will reinforce the action of letting them stay at the kennel for some time. Owners sometimes feel a little nervous or selfish about putting their pets where it is unfamiliar. But there is no need to worry because the pet gets the best of everything while they are there. The attention, food and surroundings are the best and the pet will soon come to realize that it has not been abandoned. Even owners are surprised that their pet no longer exhibits nervous tendencies and their behavior is improved enormously over time.

========

Connor Sullivan recently learned about dog boarding Snohomish techniques to help keep his dog in great shape. He inquired about classes at dog boarding Bellevue in an effort to help hunters learn how to train their dogs.


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Universe Today - 25 new stories for 2010/06/01

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25 new stories for 2010/06/01

Podcast: History of Astronomy, Part 4: The Beginning of Modern Astronomy"

Einstein

With our proper place in the Universe worked out, and some powerful telescopes to probe the cosmos, astronomers started making some real progress. The next few hundred years was a time of constant refinement, with astronomers discovering new planets, new moons, and developing new theories in astronomy and physics.

Click here to download the episode.

Or subscribe to: astronomycast.com/podcast.xml with your podcatching software.

History of Astronomy, Part 4: The Beginning of Modern Astronomy shownotes and transcript.


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Podcast: History of Astronomy, Part 3: The Renaissance

Galileo

Now we reach time with names that many of you will be familiar: Galileo, Kepler, Copernicus. This is an age when the biggest names in astronomy used the best tools of their time to completely rearrange their understanding of the Universe, putting the Earth where it belonged – merely orbiting the Sun, and not the center of everything.

Click here to download the episode.

Or subscribe to: astronomycast.com/podcast.xml with your podcatching software.

History of Astronomy, Part 3: The Renaissance show notes and transcipt.


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This Week in Space

This week from Miles O'Brien and the TWIS team: Neil Armstrong speaks out against Obama plan and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk fires back, Atlantis returns home home – perhaps permanently, Delta 4 and Ariane 5 rockets fly, black holes merge with a bang, and news from Mars' North Pole.


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Carnival of Space #156

This week's Carnival of Space is hosted by The Spacewriter — Carolyn Collins Petersen — over at The Spacewriter's Ramblings.

Click here to read the Carnival of Space #156.

And if you're interested in looking back, here's an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space. If you've got a space-related blog, you should really join the carnival. Just email an entry to carnivalofspace@gmail.com, and the next host will link to it. It will help get awareness out there about your writing, help you meet others in the space community – and community is what blogging is all about. And if you really want to help out, let Fraser know if you can be a host, and he'll schedule you into the calendar.

Finally, if you run a space-related blog, please post a link to the Carnival of Space. Help us get the word out.


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Astronomy Without A Telescope – Life In Cosmic Rays

We all know that astronomy is just plain awesome – and pretty much everything that's interesting in the world links back to astronomy and space science in one way or another. Here I'm thinking gravity, wireless internet and of course ear thermometers. But wouldn't it be great if we could ascribe the whole origin of life to astronomy as well? Well, apparently we can – and it's all about cosmic rays.(...)
Read the rest of Astronomy Without A Telescope – Life In Cosmic Rays (475 words)


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Spying on a Hubble Telescope Look-Alike

Keyhole 11 satellite, imaged in orbit about 600 km (360 miles) away. Image courtesy Ralf Vandebergh.

Amateur astronomer Ralf Vandebergh from the Netherlands is becoming well-known for his ability to capture images of the space shuttle, space station and other satellites in low Earth orbit. Recently, he tried his hand at something a little more distant: The Keyhole 11-4 satellite, which orbits at about 600 km (360 miles) above the Earth. The KH-11 series of satellites was the first American spy satellite to utilize optical digital imaging, and create a real-time optical observation capability for reconnaissance of other countries. There were about 10 of these satellites, launched by the American National Reconnaissance Office between December 1976 and 1990. These satellites are about same shape as the Hubble Space Telescope – a cylinder with solar arrays on each side, but a little bigger: according to Wikipedia, the KH 11's are thought to be about 19.5 meters (63 feet) long, while Hubble is 13.1 meters (43.5 ft) long. Hubble's orbit is similar, at about 353 miles (569 kilometers), but a big difference is that while Hubble is pointed out towards space, the KH 11's are pointed back at Earth, looking at the happenings of humans.
(...)
Read the rest of Spying on a Hubble Telescope Look-Alike (310 words)


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Carnival of Space #155

This week's Carnival of Space is hosted by Brian Schmidt over at Backseat Driving.

Click here to read the Carnival of Space #155.

And if you're interested in looking back, here's an archive to all the past Carnivals of Space. If you've got a space-related blog, you should really join the carnival. Just email an entry to carnivalofspace@gmail.com, and the next host will link to it. It will help get awareness out there about your writing, help you meet others in the space community – and community is what blogging is all about. And if you really want to help out, let Fraser know if you can be a host, and he'll schedule you into the calendar.

Finally, if you run a space-related blog, please post a link to the Carnival of Space. Help us get the word out.


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First Ever Video of NASA's 'Ice Team'

NASA has released, for the first time, video of the final inspection of a space shuttle before launch. The Final Inspection Team, also known as the "Ice Team," performs a walkdown of Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A during space shuttle Atlantis' STS-132 launch countdown on May 14, 2010. The six-member team walks on every level of the pad's fixed service structure, inspecting the shuttle, external fuel tank, solid rocket boosters, pad structure and ground equipment for signs of ice buildup, debris or anything else that might be amiss prior to launch. As part of the inspection, photos are taken and transmitted to the launch team for review.

A videographer for NASA was included as a member of the team to capture the first-ever up close, high-definition video of this important and hazardous inspection process.


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Weekend SkyWatcher's Forecast: May 28-30, 2010

Greetings, fellow SkyWatchers! It's a green "Corn Moon" weekend and time to get out of the house and enjoy the night sky! Enjoy sharing "Moon Illusion" with friends or simply spotting bright features with easy optics. In the mood to kick back and stargaze? The learn more about the constellation of Leo and what to look for when skies are bright. If you're ready for a challenge, then try your hand at a few bright galaxies by holiday's end. Whenever you're ready, I'll see you in the backyard…. (...)
Read the rest of Weekend SkyWatcher's Forecast: May 28-30, 2010 (1,096 words)


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Amateur Astronomer Images X37-B Space Plane in Orbit

X37-B spaceplane captured in orbit by UT reader Brent 'Bozo.'

Even since amateur astronomers picked up on the orbit of the Air Force's secret X37-B space plane, others have been trying to capture images of the mini-space shuttle look-alike. So far, images have been just streaks or dots, but Universe Today reader Brent (a.k.a. HelloBozos) was actually able to image the plane in some detail. "This is the first I know of or have seen an actual photo taken of the X37-B Air Force Space Plane in some detail, while in orbit!" Brent said in an email. He tracked the X37-B manually with his telescope's handcontroller, and he used a CanonT1i prime focus on a 2 inch diagonal. "This image was taken on 5-26-2010 at 9:48 pm EST, Orlando, Florida, USA. It crossed from the southwest to the northeast, crossing next to Mars and headed to the handle of the Big Dipper on a 71 degree pass."

Below, Brent also captured a flare of the X37-B.
(...)
Read the rest of Amateur Astronomer Images X37-B Space Plane in Orbit (125 words)


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Answer Posted for This Week's WITU Challenge

Mars or Earth? That is the question. Find the answer back at the original post for this week's Where In The Universe challenge. And check back next week for another test of your visual knowledge of the cosmos.


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The Last Train to KSC: Final Set of Solid Rocket Boosters Arrive

Railway cars carrying the final SRB segments arrived at Kennedy Space Center on May 27. 2010. Credit: Alan Walters (awaltersphoto.com) for Universe Today.

Another end-of-an-era event heralding the conclusion of the space shuttle program: the final set of space shuttle solid rocket booster segments arrived at the Kennedy Space Center on Thursday, May 27, 2010. The segments were carried on railway cars from the ATK factory in Utah where the boosters are built. The last part of the trip from Jacksonville, Florida included passenger cars carrying NASA personnel and ATK officials, including astronaut Mike Massimino, shuttle launch director Mike Leinbach, and the "voice" of NASA TV, George Diller. The train stopped across the Indian River from KSC where the tracks lead to the Vehicle Assembly Building.

The boosters will be stacked in the VAB for a possible rescue mission, or perhaps, even one last add-on flight for space shuttle Atlantis.
(...)
Read the rest of The Last Train to KSC: Final Set of Solid Rocket Boosters Arrive (490 words)


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SOFIA Sees First Light

With a NASA F/A-18 flying safety chase nearby, NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy – or SOFIA – flies a test mission over the Mojave Desert with the sliding door over its 17-ton infrared telescope open. Credit: NASA/ Jim Ross

Flying SOFIA has opened her eyes! The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), a joint program by NASA and the German Aerospace Center made its first observations on May 26. The new observatory uses a modified 747 airplane to carry a German-built 2.5 meter (100 inch) reflecting telescope. "With this flight, SOFIA begins a 20-year journey that will enable a wide variety of astronomical science observations not possible from other Earth and space-borne observatories," said Jon Morse, Astrophysics Division director in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA. "It clearly sets expectations that SOFIA will provide us with "Great Observatory"-class astronomical science."
(...)
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Air Force Launches Next Generation GPS Satellite

Delta IV rocket launching with the Air Force's Global Positioning System GPS IIF SV-1. Credit: Alan Walters (awaltersphoto.com) for Universe Today

The first in a series of next-generation GPS satellites launched late Thursday from Cape Canaveral launch Complex 37 on board a Delta IV rocket. The Air Force's Global Positioning System GPS IIF SV-1 satellite blasted off at 11 p.m. EDT on May 27, 2010, after overcoming three different launch aborts over the last week due to weather and technical glitches. Following its three hour, 33 minute flight into orbit, the new satellite has reached its orbit 18,000 km (11,000 miles) above the Earth, joining a constellation of 24 other GPS satellites that aids in military operations and helps civilians navigate the planet. Boeing, who built the satellite for the Air Force, said they acquired the first on-orbit signals from the new satellite early Friday, and all indications are that the spacecraft bus is functioning normally and ready to begin orbital maneuvers and operational testing.
(...)
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Japan Shoots for Robotic Moon Base by 2020

Concept drawing of a robotic lunar base. Credit: JAXA

These ARE the droids we've been looking for. The Japanese space agency, JAXA, has plans to build a base on the Moon by 2020. Not for humans, but for robots, and built by robots, too. A panel authorized by Japan's prime minister has drawn up preliminary plans of how humanoid and rover robots will begin surveying the moon by 2015, and then begin construction of a base near the south pole of the moon. The robots and the base will run on solar power, with total costs about $2.2 billion USD, according to the panel chaired by Waseda University President Katsuhiko Shirai.
(...)
Read the rest of Japan Shoots for Robotic Moon Base by 2020 (253 words)


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Andromeda's Unstable Black Hole

The Andromeda galaxy as seen in optical light, and Chandra's X-ray vision of the changing supermassive black hole in Andromeda's heart. Image Credit: X-Ray NASA/CXC/SAO/Li et al.), Optical (DSS)

The Andromeda galaxy, the closest spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way, has a supermassive black hole at the center of it much like other galaxies. Because of its proximity to us, Andromeda – or M31 – is an excellent place to study just how the supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies consume material to grow, and interact gravitationally with the surrounding material.

Over the course of the last ten years, NASA's Chandra X-Ray observatory has monitored closely the supermassive black hole at Andromeda's heart. This long-term data set gives astronomers a very nuanced picture of just how these monstrous black holes change over time. Zhiyuan Li of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) presented results of this decade-long observation of the black hole at the 216th American Astronomical Society meeting in Miami, Florida this week.(...)
Read the rest of Andromeda's Unstable Black Hole (329 words)


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Successful Test of Air-Breathing Scramjet Engine

Boeing and the US Air Force tested a supersonic combustion ramjet engine on May 26 with the longest hypersonic flight in history. The X-51A WaveRider was dropped from a B-52 and flew for nearly three and a half minutes, flying at five times the speed of sound – Mach 5. The unmanned aerial vehicle was tested off the southern California coast around 10 a.m. on May 26, and it flew autonomously for more than 200 seconds, but then something then occurred that caused the vehicle to lose acceleration. But the teams who worked on the project are still calling the test a success.
(...)
Read the rest of Successful Test of Air-Breathing Scramjet Engine (339 words)


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Black Hole in M87 Wanders using Jetpack

Hubble Space Telescope Images of M87. At right, a large scale image taken with the Wide-Field/Planetary Camera-2 from 1998. The zoom-in images on the left are of the central portion of M87. HST-1 is a knot in the jet from the SMBH. (NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), J. A. Biretta, W. B. Sparks, F. D. Macchetto, E. S. Perlman)

The elliptical galaxy M87 is known for a jet of radiation that is streaming from the supermassive black hole (SMBH) that the galaxy houses. This jet, which is visible through large-aperture telescopes, may have functioned as a black hole 'jetpack', moving the SMBH from the center of mass of the galaxy – where most SMBHs are thought to reside.

Observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope by a collaboration of astronomy researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology, Florida Institute of Technology and University of Sussex in the United Kingdom show the SMBH in M87 to be displaced from the center of the galaxy by as much as 7 parsecs (22.82 light years). This contradicts the long-held theory that supermassive black holes reside at the center of the galaxies they inhabit, and may give astronomers one way to trace the history of galaxies that have grown through merging.(...)
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Time-Lapse Satellite View of Growing Oil Spill

We've featured many satellite views of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, here on Universe Today, but this time-lapse video puts them all together. The video reveals a space-based view beginning on April 12 before the accident, then after the April 20 explosion, with the burning oil rig. Later, the ensuing oil spill is captured through May 24. Two NASA satellites are constantly capturing images Earth, focusing on particular areas of interest, the Terra and Aqua satellites which both have the MODIS instrument (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer.) The oil slick appears grayish-beige in the image and changes due to changing weather, currents, and use of oil dispersing chemicals.

The latest word on the "top kill" effort to stop the gushing oil well is that it has seen initial success.
(...)
Read the rest of Time-Lapse Satellite View of Growing Oil Spill (195 words)


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Where In the Universe #106

Here's this week's Where In The Universe Challenge. You know what to do: take a look at this image and see if you can determine where in the universe this image is from; give yourself extra points if you can name the instrument responsible for the image. We'll provide the image today, but won't reveal the answer until tomorrow. This gives you a chance to mull over the image and provide your answer/guess in the comment section. Please, no links or extensive explanations of what you think this is — give everyone the chance to guess.

UPDATE: The answer has now been posted below.
(...)
Read the rest of Where In the Universe #106 (130 words)


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Masten Successfully Re-Ignites Rocket Engine During Test Flight

"This was by far the coolest rocket flight I've ever seen!" said Ian Garcia, Guidance, Navigation, and Controls Engineer for Masten Space Systems.

I'll second that! With their motto, "Just gas 'em up and go!" the Masten team today successfully demonstrated in-air engine re-light capability on their Xombie vehicle, and this was the first time that a vertical take-off, vertical landing vehicle has successfully performed a such a re-ignition during flight.
(...)
Read the rest of Masten Successfully Re-Ignites Rocket Engine During Test Flight (264 words)


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Galaxies Like Grains of Sand in New Herschel Image

Image of the distant Universe as seen by Herschel's SPIRE instrument Credit: ESA / SPIRE and HerMES consortia

Wow. Just wow. Each of the colored dots in this new image from the Herschel telescope is a galaxy containing billions of stars. These are distant luminous infrared galaxies, and appear as they did 10–12 billion years ago, packed together like grains of sand on a beach, forming large clusters of galaxies by the force of their mutual gravity.

"These amazing new results from Herschel are just a taste of things to come, as Herschel continues to unlock the secrets of the early stages of star birth and galaxy formation in our Universe," said Dr. David Parker, Director of Space Science and Exploration at the UK Space Agency.
(...)
Read the rest of Galaxies Like Grains of Sand in New Herschel Image (315 words)


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Man-Made Object Spotted Orbiting the Sun

2010 KQ - a man-made object spotted orbiting the sun. Credit: Richard Miles, BAA via the Las Cumbres Observatory.

My dotAstronomy pal Edward Gomez from the Las Cumbres Observatory is reporting that a man-made object has been spotted orbiting the sun. First noticed in the Catalina Sky Survey on May 16, it was thought to be an asteroid, but then, because of its very circular and low-inclined orbit, Richard Miles, using the Faulkes Telescope North realized it could be man-made. Now dubbed 2010 KQ, it orbits the Sun every 1.04 years, and on May 21 it came within 1.28 lunar-distances of the Earth. Miles captured this image of the object, above, and spectral analysis of 2010 KQ is consistent with UV-aged titanium dioxide paint. What could it be?
(...)
Read the rest of Man-Made Object Spotted Orbiting the Sun (67 words)


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Atlantis Crew 'Riding Inside a Fireball'

ISS astronaut Soichi Noguchi captured Atlantis and her crew streaking through the atmosphere on their return to Earth. Credit: Soichi Noguchi/JAXA/NASA

At a post-landing news conference, STS-132 commander Ken Ham described the incredible visual effects the crew of Atlantis witnessed as they returned to Earth today. As the shuttle was engulfed in plasma during the hottest part of their re-entry through Earth's atmosphere, they were in orbital darkness, which highlighted the orange, fiery glow around the shuttle. "We were clearly riding inside of a fireball, and we flew right into the sunrise from inside this fireball, so we could see the blue color of the Earth's horizon coming through the orange. It was amazing and just visually overwhelming."

As evidence, ISS astronaut Soichi Noguchi captured Atlantis as that fireball, streaking though atmosphere, just as dawn approached. "Dawn, and Space Shuttle re-entered atmosphere over Pacific Ocean. 32 years of service, 32nd beautiful landing. Forever, Atlantis!" Noguchi wrote on Twitter, posting a link to the image.

Amazing.
(...)
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© nancy for Universe Today, 2010. | Permalink | One comment | Add to del.icio.us
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Newly-Discovered Stellar Nurseries in the Milky Way

The Orion Nebula, one of the most brilliant star-forming regions in our galaxy. Other, newly-discovered regions like the Orion Nebula could help astronomers determing the chemical composition of our galaxy. Image Credit: APOD/Hubble Space Telescope

Our Milky Way churns out about seven new stars per year on average. More massive stars are formed in what's called H II regions, so-named because the gas present in these stellar nurseries is ionized by the radiation of the young, massive stars forming there. Recently-discovered regions in the Milky Way that are nurseries for massive stars may hold important clues as to the chemical composition and structural makeup of our galaxy.(...)
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© nick for Universe Today, 2010. | Permalink | 5 comments | Add to del.icio.us
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